Best of Sean Paul

Sean Paul, now how can you forget a name like that? When it came to dancehall reggae, Sean Paul owned the 2000s. Hit after hit after hit after hit, Sean Paul’s music was played at parties and in clubs around the world. A decade later in 2014 and you will STILL hear your favorite Paul song being blasted on the streets. Check out the videos to his top hits:

Get Busy

I’m Still in Love With You Ft. Sasha

Temperature

Ever Blazin’

Like Glue

Gimmie the Light

Beyonce – Baby Boy

Sound System Culture: A New Book Reveals Huddersfield’s Hidden Reggae History

The good people at Fader Magazine wrote a great article about a new book on UK sound system culture. Sound System Culture, Celebrating Huddersfield’s Sound Systems focuses on the market town of Huddersfield. Check out Fader’s article below.

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  • Earth Rocker sound system inside Cleopatra’s (later named Silver Sands), Venn Street, Huddersfield, late 1970s. Clockwise from left: Papa Burky (Stephen Burke, operator/selector), Ducky Ranks (Donald Senior, MC), Yellowman (Robert Daley, crew member), Hunter (Brian Chester, crew member), Pumpkin (Errol Allison, crew member) and Greaves (Andy Greaves, MC). One of the biggest and most respected sound systems in the north of England, Earth Rocker was formed in 1975 by Stephen Burke, who was born in Huddersfield to Jamaican parents. The main selector and operator for the sound, Burke is a cabinet maker by trade, and continues to build boxes for sound systems across the UK and Europe to this day. According to writer Noel Hawks, who used to work at Dub Vendor record shop in South London: “One of our top mail-order customers ran a sound in Huddersfield. We used to send him up a box of pre-release singles COD nearly every week. He was so regular I can still recall his address, including the postcode, over thirty years later.” That customer was Stephen Burke. Photo courtesy Stephen Burke

Today the UK’s Notting Hill Carnival will be winding its way through the streets of west London for day two of the annual celebrations, five decades on from the very first event in 1964. A celebration of Afro-Caribbean culture in the UK capital, at its heart is music—steel pan bands, Carnival parties and dozens of sound systems set up in the cordoned-off streets. The UK’s love of sound systems has its roots in the late ’40s when hundreds of people from Jamaica and across the West Indies were invited to move to Britain and help reinvigorate the country following World War II. It was thanks to that first generation of Caribbean settlers that some truly unlikely places went on to become thriving centers of sound system culture—like Huddersfield, a small town in the north of England. In the slideshow above, Al Newman of One Love Books shares a series of fascinating photos from his new title Sound System Culture: Celebrating Huddersfield’s Sound Systems and explains below how the book came to be.

Al Newman: “The Sound System Culture book was conceived by Huddersfield-based historian Mandy Samra as part of a larger heritage project that also included a film and touring exhibition, documenting the rich history of reggae sound systems in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.

I was first contacted by Mandy a little under a year ago, just before the exhibition began touring, when she approached me to design the book after seeing one of my previous books, Clarks in Jamaica. I loved the subject and the little-known history of the Huddersfield sounds and ended up getting much more involved in the research and editing, working with Yorkshire soundman Paul Axis’ text, and eventually publishing the book through my company, One Love Books.

In this excerpt from the book, Mandy explains how the project came about: “While never an insider of the sound system scene, I’ve always had an interest in sound systems and around five years ago I first had the idea for this project, but did not know where to begin. One day I was talking with my boiler man, Michael Royal, who revealed that he had been a sound operator for Duke Warrior, a Huddersfield-based sound system that had been active during the 1970s. Two people, who on the surface shared little in common, found a connecting thread in their interest in sound systems.”

We are now looking to expand the project into other UK cities, eventually building up a history of sound systems throughout the whole of the UK.”

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Sound System Culture: Celebrating Huddersfield’s Sound Systems is available now from One Love Books.

Written by: Ruth Saxelby

Article Link: http://www.thefader.com

 

Music Monday: My Funkiest Morning Mix

Happy Monday everyone! Today’s Music Monday features a playlist created by VeroMag. This smooth mix includes your favorite old school reggae sounds with a hint of Ska Punk in the mix. Let us make your Monday a relaxing one. Click play and jam on!

 

 

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Music Monday: Best of Popcaan

 

 

Popcaan, Jamaican Reggae artist, born Andre Jay Sutherland on July 15th, 1988 is our Music Monday choice for the week. Popcaan started his dancehall music career when he joined Vybz Kartel crew in 2007, and has been a household name ever since. His debut album “Where We Come From” released on June 10, 2014 has been a huge success. The album climbed to Billboards “Top Reggae Albums” and is sitting nicely at number two. So, if you are a fan of dancehall reggae check out this mix created by DJ Arems. DANCE ON!

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Twitter: @PopcaanMusic 

Facebook: Popcaan

 

Major Lazer’s Walshy Fire Presents: Jesse Royal “Royally Speaking”

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Since its release on July 14th, Jesse Royal’s “Royally Speaking” has been been receiving record-breaking streams on SoundCloud and beyond. Jesse’s smooth voice alongside whine worthy beats takes listeners back to the homeland. These riddims are perfect for your backyard boogie, day time beach party and, of course, your sweaty, underground club.

 

Tracklist:

1. Intro/Warning
2. Hotta the Battle
3. Greedy Babylon
4. Modern Day Judas
5. Preying on the Weak (Overstand Ent.)
6. Clear My Head (Gachapan Records)
7. Light Like A Feather
8. Silent River
9. Good Morning
10. D.O.A (Dreaming of Africa)
11. Baby Let Me Be
12. Butterflies
13. Little Did They Know (XTM Nation)
14. Talk To Me
15. World Cry (Jus Bus Remix)
16. Wadada (Burning Spear Remix)
17. Jam Rock (Gachapan/Palace Pikney Records)
18. Forever (Eccentrix)
19. Gimmie Likkle Herb
20. Muddy Road
21. Runnin
22. Get Away
23. If I Give You My Love (Maya Angelou Speaks)
24. Journey (Gachapan/Palace Pikney Records)
25. Rastafari Call You/Outro

 

www.jesseroyal1.com
www.facebook.com/royallyspeaking
www.twitter.com/jesseroyal1

Music Monday: OLD SCHOOL REGGAE VOL 1

SoundCloud is one of the best platforms to find any type of music, from underground to mainstream to remixes of your favorite Lana Del Rey song. The amount of talent that is a couple clicks away is out of this world.

Music Monday used to be a popular trending movement on social media that unfortunately slowly disappeared. But the House of Marley is bringing it back. Today’s tunes consist of old school reggae tracks that will bring level vibes to your busy monday.

 

 

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VOLUME 1 OF DJ CRE-8’s OLD SCHOOL REGGAE SERIES! HOTTEST TUNES FROM THE PAST TO MAKE YOU REMINISCE ABOUT THE BASEMENT & HOUSE PARTYS! HITS FROM BUJU BANTON, BARRINGTON LEVY, SHABBA RANKS ETC! ENJOY AND STAY TUNED FOR PART 2! PEACE” – DJ CRE-8

 

 

Your Favorite Pop Song with a Reggae Twist

It is difficult to put into words the influence that Reggae Music has on the world. But you can hear it everywhere, from steel drum samples to recorded skits in rap songs from your favorite Kingston drug lord. Reggae music is timeless music, a representation of a culture and lifestyle often mimicked and duplicated. But who doesn’t love a reggae flip of your favorite pop song?  Take a listen to our top 10:

 

Adele – Set Fire To The Rain (Reggae version by Reggaesta)

Beyoncé – Drunk in Love (reggae version by Reggaesta)

Lana Del Rey – Video Games [reggae version]

Wrecking Ball – Miley Cyrus Reggae Remix

When I Was Your Man – Bruno Mars Reggae Remix

Alicia Keys – Girl On Fire (J-Vibe Reggae Remix)

Pharrell Williams – Happy (Cousin Cole Reggae Mix)

Royals –  Lorde Reggae Remix

No Doubt – Don’t Speak (Reggae version by Reggaesta)

Gotye ft Kimbra –  Somebody That I Used To Know Jr GoBlender Reggae Refix

Happy International Reggae Day!

Today is International Reggae Day and The House of Marley would like to encourage you to take your time and appreciate the different sounds of reggae music. Comment below and let us know your favorite reggae tune.

 

 

Jimmy Cliff – World Upside Down

 

Peter Tosh – Rastafari Is

 

Stephen Marley Ft. Damian Marley – Jah Army

 

Barrington Levy – Sensimilla

 

Rebelution – Ordinary Girl

 

Sanchez – Never Dis Man

 

Queen Ifrica – Keep It Your Self

 

Sean Paul – Temperature

 

Skrillex & Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley – Make It Bun Dem ($1 Bin Remix)

Gyptian – Hold Yuh

The Cultural Connection Between Reggae, Hip-Hop and Afrika Bambaataa

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It’s nearly impossible to point at one musician and say they started a genre, but if there were no Afrika Bambaataa, it’s safe to say there would be no such thing as hip-hop. From his early days of DJing/throwing parties in South Bronx to his mega-smash “Planet Rock,” Bambaataa has been a positive cultural touchstone for 40 years.

The House of Marley is excited to be taking part in Afrika’s 40th anniversary weekend, which includes a number of shows happening in New York City from November 6 through November 10. With a heavy hitting lineup that features live performances from hip-hop all stars including Ultramagnetic MCs, Ice T, Ice Cube, Public Enemy and more, this weekend is sure to be a killer time.

As Afrika has often said, the connection between reggae and hip-hop is one that runs extremely deep. The proof is in the music, as our namesake Bob Marley has been sampled by dozens of hip-hop artists throughout the years. In preparation of Afrika Bambaataa’ 40th anniversary party in New York, we’re taking a look at some of the best Bob Marley samples throughout the history of rap. Pop on some headphones and lose yourself in some of the best music of the past few decades.

Jungle Brothers “Doin’ Our Own Dang”

Naming himself after Afrika Bambaataa, the Jungle Brothers’ Baby Bam also makes a reference to Bob Marley with a sample of “Jammin'” on the group’s track “Doin’ Our Own Dang.” Bam will be DJing as a part of the festivities for November 6 and he is sure to break out more of the sick reggae records that inspired him.

Kardinal Offishall “Naughty Dread”

Taking the name of his track straight from the Bob Marley song he samples, Kardinal Offishall’s “Naughty Dread” is a laid back lesson in flow. Still rapping a decade after he first hit the hip-hop scene, Kardinal continues with his socially conscious efforts and has been working hard for charities in Haiti.

The Game w/ Swizz Beatz and Jay Electronica “Higher”

On The Game’s debut record, Dr. Dre utilized Bob Marley’s “Iron Lion Zion” as the propelling beat of the track “Higher.” Starting off with the classic chant from 1974 recording, the song quickly kicks into overdrive with a flourish of drums and sirens.

Public Enemy “Fight The Power”

“Fight The Power” is the ultimate hip-hop sound collage, as it pastes together some of the most commonly used samples in a way that has never been done again since. While at times it’s hard to hear Bob Marley’s “I Shot The Sheriff” in the song, it’s apparent Public Enemy’s social conscious music is deeply indebted to the reggae singer. Check out Public Enemy when they perform on November 8, at the National Black Theatre as a part of the Afrika Bambaataa birthday celebration.