Phil Frost Interview

Chances are, if you’re familiar with street artists you’ve probably come across works of Phil Frost, whether you know it or not. (Remember that Frank 151 chapter?) One of the original artists to hit the scene in the early 90’s, Phil helped shape where contemporary art’s at today.


Cruising the depths of Instagram on Bob Marley’s 70th Birthday, we were tagged in a post that brought us a new fact about Phil – that he’s a big fan of reggae music and in particular, Bob Marley. Naturally, we had to reach out to him and hear more. Peep the interview below!

HOM: Are you still NYC based?

PF: I actually live in upstate New York now. I moved up here 7 years ago. I was always moving around trying to find more space to make my work while I was in town. I relocated up here after I found a giant space that facilitates all of my work.

HOM: A lot of our team members quote your work with Frank 151 as a way they discovered you. Can you tell me about that?

PF: Steve Malbon from Frank151 arranged for a studio visit and came upstate to do so. There he saw the drawings that MQ and I were collaboratively making, and the conversation to participate by sharing an issue together came from that.

image1HOM: I came across your post in celebration of Bob Marley’s 70th Birthday on Instagram, where you talk about Bob Marley and reggae – what is it that draws you to the two?

PF: I’m drawn to reggae music because of it’s inherent morale and uplifting nature; to want to better yourself and your surroundings and be humble, kind and respectful of things. So it appeals to me like that, in that I like the message of it; and then I like the energy and rythym also. It is good natured and positive and I was taken by it. At some point, I got really interested in wanting to hear it more. I began to collect the 45’s and records because a lot of the music isn’t necessarily released digitally. I don’t know too much about digital music anyway, but at the time a lot of the music wasn’t really able to be found on a CD or digital format so a lot of the rare music is only on a 45. Seeking out the records and collecting them was a way to be able to introduce myself to parts of the sound I couldn’t find otherwise. At some point, it began to seem like I was protecting old records by archiving them, like a way of preserving them and their relevant importance.

HOM: Do you mostly listen to music on records?

PF: I guess I mostly listen to music on records. For some reason its kind of relaxing.

HOM: Would you say you listen to it when you work, when you’re painting?

PF: Music has its place in my life. A lot of times I listen to silence, but then silence gets in the way. Listening to music is actually something of a distraction when I’m working, in that i’m not able to focus as much on whatever is resounding inside me. Yet, then there are times where I’m working, and I’m not experiencing that kind of inner dialogue and music can be something that helps the time pass more enjoyably. Sometimes I listen to music when I work and sometimes I don’t. There is part of my work process that music is just in the way of; and for that, it’s silence that keeps me more nimble. Then there are times where there is a task, something I am supposed to do, and I don’t have to figure anything out and nothing’s on my mind, and it’s those parts of the working experience where listening to music is more fitting. I guess it can be like therapeutic, the parts of process where you can zone out.

image3HOM: Such a great answer and one that really makes sense to me, personally. Can you tell us a bit about how you got started making art and what that was like for you?

PF: In the mid and late 80’s I was into skateboarding. I was skating a lot in Brooklyn with friends. Thats where I can say I really got into art, and by skating in the city and being into hardcore music I was exposed to graffiti. I started to get into tagging. When I was 18 I moved to Queens and then I began to work more seriously with it. Before that I would tag a bit when skateboarding, but it wasn’t an all consuming thing. Then when I was 18 I was on my own and living in Queens and working in the city – it’s when it took over and kinda became a part of me in an overall way for a period. I started to draw all the time and do wheat pastings. Then I started to spend a lot of time with Revs. I started to help out and do missions with he and Cost.

HOM: What was it like working with Revs and Cost?

PF: Revs and Cost, they kind of started the whole wheat pasting thing and the block buster rooftop rollers. I was so honored to help and work with them and spend so much time with Revs. I started to help them. Mostly, I started to help Revs all the time, but both of them sometimes too, on their missions, and sometimes with Revs simultaneously while doing my own. After a while it just kinda started to be a thing I used to do. I would find some sort of weird industrial thing coming out of a building or some sort of utilitarian piping, or venting boxes coming off a building. I would measure off the different panels and cut the measured panels out of brown butcher paper. Then I would draw with ink and paint paintings on those paper panels. I would figure out the best option for pulling it off, like a particular night or if even in broad daylight and then I would go and wheat paste them onto those things to create some type of painting sculpture sort of work in the street and feel that pulsing inner rush type of inspiration from it.

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There are meetings with people that leave you feeling inspired and almost in awe – wanting to learn more and understand, and this certainly was one of them. We hope to bring you more of Phil Frost’s works in the near future! In the meantime, you can check out more of his work on his gallery’s website – Galeria Javier Lopez, Phil’s personal website, and if you’re like us, Phil Frost’s Instagram. Big thanks to Phil for taking the time to speak with us!

House of Marley’s The Get Together: AllDayEveryDay


For that brief moment when hasty New Yorkers stop in their tracks and turn into spectators fascinated by a group of break-dancing street performers, the Big Apple tastes a bit sweeter. It is this acrobatic art spawned from the Bronx that unites people around the globe with the joys of laughter, wonder and imagination among many others. For the fourth installment of House of Marley‘s video series highlighting its new Bluetooth speaker The Get Together, Brooklyn-based Director Harrison Boyce chose to look into the personalities of these talented dancers. “I wanted to find out if they really loved dance and the trains were their platform to share their talent with the world, or if they were hustlers using dance to make money, and I quickly found out that they have a deep love for dancing and that the money was secondary.” After checking out Boyce’s film, be sure to read through our full interview with the director below.

For more on House of Marley’s The Get Together Bluetooth speaker as well as how you could win your very own please visit here.


Can you introduce yourself?

My name is Harrison Boyce and I’m a director and photographer living in Brooklyn, New York.

How did you get into filmmaking?

It all started through BMX. I rode BMX throughout my whole childhood and ended up being a sponsored rider, then working as an art director for a company, as well as starting one of, if not the first BMX blogs called Defgrip. I was always filming and making videos with my friends, but it wasn’t until I started making short docs and creating content for Defgrip that I really started to get into film making. It was just a hobby for me at the time, but once I moved to New York, I started to get a lot more directing jobs and over the years have transitioned from working as a designer in the BMX world to a director focusing on fashion and commercial work.

What was the goal behind your video? What was your inspiration?

Living in New York I pretty much ride the subway every day and kept seeing these kids dancing in the trains. I had thought about doing a project about them, but it was only in the back of my head and I didn’t really have an outlet for it. So, once I started talking with Alldayeveryday about this project with House of Marley, it made perfect sense to put something together with the dancers for this project.

The goal behind the video for me was to find out who the kids were who were the first to start dancing on the trains and to showcase them as people. To share their personalities with the world and tell their story. I wanted to find out if they really loved dance and the trains were their platform to share their talent with the world, or if they were hustlers using dance to make money… and I quickly found out that they have a deep love for dancing and that the money was secondary.

What are you most excited about your relationship with House of Marley?

House of Marley has been incredible with this project because they just let me do my thing and supported my vision 100%. A lot of time brands can really get involved and almost take over the creative process, but the guys at House of Marley essentially laid down the foundation for a dream project and let me do my thing the whole way though with nothing but support. A perfect partnership.

When you were approached about the project, what was the direction given and then how did you approach your execution/interpretation?

Allday approached me, and I asked if I’d be interested in putting some ideas together around the idea of “getting together.” They really wanted to leave it up to the directors to bring ideas to the table, so it was really open as far as the creative goes.

I just worked on a few different ideas around the idea of “getting together” using music as the main ingredient that actually brought people together.

How influential has music been in your creative evolution?

Music has been a huge influence in my work and it really drives my creative process, especially in the edit. I grew up in a musical family and music has always been something that plays a part in anything I’m doing creatively. Specifically with film, music becomes such a big part of telling a story, creating emotions, and setting a flow and an arch… I like to work with the music first, building a foundation to edit on and everything else really falls into place if you have the right music or soundtrack.

Was there any issues with filming on the subway?

I wasn’t sure how it was going to be bringing a Red camera down there, but we didn’t have any problems at all. I’m pretty good with filming in random situations and can just roll with the flow and the Waffle Crew definitely knows the ins and outs of performing on the subways. We tried to keep moving and not stay in one spot too long and I think that definitely helped us not run into any problems.

You’ve worked on everything from commercial films to short films and fashion films – which of the projects would you say is your favorite to collaborate on?

I think my favorite thing is the fact that I’m able to work on so many different types of projects. To me it’s more about the people and the experiences I have making my work, than the specific type of genre I’m working in. I really like to learn about people, explore new places, and basically do anything I can to learn something new each day. So I feel super lucky that I’ve been able to work on so many diverse projects with such a broad range.

Author: Robert Marshall

*Originally posted on HYPEBEAST 

LowLine: New York’s New Underground Park


New York City may seem like the last place that you’d expect to see plantlife set amongst the grit and grime of the streets. Think again! Two visionaries named Dan Barasch and Jay Ramsey are taking green life to somewhere even more unique and unusual — under the streets of NYC. Meet their vision for one of the world’s first underground parks, LowLine.

Barasch and Ramsey are at the helm of this brand new project that includes plans to use solar technology to help transform an unused trolley terminal into a lush, green space. Opened in 1908, the Williamsburg Bridge Trolley Terminal on the Lower East Side was used by commuters until 1948 when the transportation services were ended. While the space has been untouched in the six decades since, much of the original architecture stands intact. This includes incredible vaulted ceilings, trolley tracks and cobblestrone streets once walked by the population of Manhattan.

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After first making waves with their Kickstarter efforts in 2012, the Lowline team raised over $150,000 for their project and set about creating a functioning full-scale model in a building above the trolley terminal. The key to the greenery in the park is the solar technology developed by Ramsey himself. With solar collection discs above grounds (think    satellite dishes), light from the sun is brought below the surface of the street and allows plantlife to complete photosynthesis.

With the full model scale functioning aboveground, the team has been working on securing the proper permits and support from elected officials to complete the underground project. In 2014, the Lowline team will continue to work with the transit authority and New York City to transfer ownership to the group. While it may seem far away, Ramsey and Barasch hope to have the Lowline park up and running by 2018.

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The concept of an underground park and the technology used to create such a dream space is something that the crew at the House of Marley can easily relate too. Ever since our company started, we’ve been dreaming up ways to create earth-friendly audio gear and we can’t help but be excited by any others who take on the same commitment to the earth. Cheers to the Lowline crew and hopefully we’ll see you under the Big Apple after your project is completed!

Photo Credit: Lizzy Zevallos/Lowline