House of Marley to Donate $100 for any donation made to the Reggae Girlz

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Yes! You read correctly — for ANY and EVERY donation, for ANY amount given, the House of Marley will match with $100. (Until we reach 25k)!

The House of Marley will be matching each donation that is given towards the Reggae Girlz World Cup 2015 Bid. For every NEW donation over the next few days, we will donate $100 for each $1 that is donated.

Referral Contest: In addition to the House of Marley matching your donation, you can also win a House of Marley Get Together Audio System. Using the Indiegogo share tools, send this campaign to as many friends & family as you can. The donor with the most referrals wins the Sound System!

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This campaign is not only for the Reggae Girlz, it is about empowering girls and women from all walks of life through athletics and beyond. Financial burdens should never be a road block in achieving one’s goals and dreams.

Canada June 6th – July 5th, will be the location of the 2015 Women’s World Cup and the next destination for our Reggae Girlz. The Jamaica’s Women’s National Team has partnered with Cedella Marley to raise money for the Women’s World Cup 2015 bid. Want to get in on the action? You can do so by donating through the Reggae Girlz’ Indiegogo page.

We encourage you to donate and spread the word!

For more information please check out the Reggae Girls Indiegogo Page

Nine Mile: The City Where Bob Marley Was Born

Where Was Bob Marley Born

While many fans believe he was a native of Kingston, Jamaica, the city where Bob Marley was born is actually Nine Mile in the parish of Saint Ann. Found in the northern part of the small island, Nine Mile is a completely rural part of the country, especially when compared to the vacation-friendly capital of Kingston.

In his teenage years, the infamous singer would move to the Trenchtown part of Kingston, where he would live out the majority of his life. Yet, after passing in 1981, Bob Marley’s body was brought back to the city where he was born and laid to rest near his brother. In tribute to the city’s fallen son, Nine Mile residents have erected shrines to Bob and the Marley family around his childhood home.

Whatever you’ve heard or known about Jamaica is completely erased once you’re in the sacred land of Nine Mile. There is something heavy in the air that alerts you to the spiritual weight of this town. Something special in the soil, which not only gives the region its fair share of bananas and coffee beans, but it is the land that gave the world Bob Marley. If you’ve never been, pack a pair of on-ear headphones, immerse yourself in the music of Marley and check out these three significant spots in Nine Mile.

The Marley Homestead

citywherebobmarleywasbornThe tiny Marley home in Nine Mile, the city where Bob Marley was born, is no bigger than 300 square feet. With two rooms, one acting as a bedroom and the other for family gatherings, the house is quaint, but offers a homey feeling. Outside of the home, you’ll see the kitchen, which features an open fire pit made of rocks, and find the entire property painted in the
traditional Ethiopian colors of
green, yellow and red.

The Marley Mausoleum

citywherebobmarleywasborn2Following the wishes of his mother Cedella Booker Marley, Bob was laid to rest in a mausoleum on the Marley family property next to his brother. Buried in 1981, Marley was placed in a casket with his beloved Gibson Les Paul and a bible opened to Psalm 23 in this unique Ethiopian themed church. The journey to the Marley mausoleum is a special one as the grounds are the same place where he was born and lived out his youth. It provides a spiritual experience that can hardly be replicated anywhere else in Jamaica.

citywherebobmarleywasbornThe Rasta Rock Pillow

In front of the mausoleum in which Bob Marley is buried, there is a famed rock that is said to have been a spot of inspiration for the late singer. Vaguely resembling a flat pillow, locals say that Marley would lay his head on the stone, an act which the songwriter later recounted in his song “Talkin’ Blues” from the Natty Dread album.