Skater Chris Haslam Shows Us How to Make Skate Ramps From Recycled Material

Since he began skating in the streets of British Columbia at the age of 13, Canadian-born skateboarder Chis Haslam has been one of the most creative skaters to hit the industry. Making his stamp by being original and technically innovative, Haslam has also shown how to make skate ramps using recycled material, creating a style all his own.

Similar to how The House of Marley uses recycled substances to create products like noise-isolating earbuds and over-ear headphones, Haslam takes what he finds on the street to build new obstacles to skate. For other skaters wondering how to make skate ramps of their own from unique material, the 31-year-old skateboarder has a definite vision of how skateboarding, art and being earth conscious interplay.

How to Make Skate Ramps

This year Haslam, along with his pro skater friend Louie Barletta, made a film for Dwindle Distribution called Skate & Create, showcasing their version of how to make skate ramps. Under the guise of a moving company, Haslam and Barletta picked up trash off the street and showed the step-by-step process of how to make skate ramps with it. Whether using TVs, bookshelves, beds or filing cabinets, the duo made skateable pieces of art out of other people’s waste.

“There are so many skaters doing the same thing… I want to see creative skating,” Haslam says of creating unique ramp setups. Echoing the eco-friendly sentiments of The House of Marley’s noise-canceling headphones, Haslam has shown successfully how to make a skate ramps from almost any discarded material. In addition, he points out that individuality is a major key in life. “You’ve got to have something unique that people will think is sick.”

Whether using recycled plastic, metal or wood, excess waste can be made into anything from a super stylish skateboarding ramp to a pair of noise-isolating earbuds or over-ear headphones. The House of Marley is proud to see skaters like Chris Haslam pushing the envelope and working an eco-friendly angle into their craft.