AfroPunk Spin Thrift Market

Who doesn’t love to go shopping? Well luckily you can empty your pockets at AfroPunk’s Spin Thrift Market. Handmade jewelry, clothing, paintings and more all crafted by creative minds who represent Afropunk. Below are a few brands that sparked our interest.

 

Petrichor NYC

“’The funeral that inspired me the most was for my best friend Kwasi Pecou,” is usually not the first sentence a fashion designer uses to introduce their brand, but then there is Petrichor NYC, a high end street-wear apparel and accessories brand, birthed by Frank Caffey. The 24-year-old Queens, New York-native, has evolved from his graphic design and photography days into a full-fledged fashion designer over the past six years’.

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Afrodesiac Worldwide

“Established in 2005, Afrodesiac Worldwide is a cultural lifestyle brand, expressive of contemporary afro-urban style around the globe. From Brooklyn to Brixton, Jamaica to Johannesburg, Addis Ababa to Accra. Our vision is to become a premier lifestyle brand, pioneering a cultural revolution in fashion.”

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T. Barnes 

“T. Barnes is the owner of Solace hair and esthetics studio, an established licensed esthetician and business owner who has serviced the Fairfield County community since 2003.  She provides facial treatments, body waxing and make-up application services. Her facial provides deep cleansing, extractions of black and white heads and amazing relaxation through shoulder and face massage with lavender and jojoba oils. She has a loyal and growing clientele who seek out quality services, events and experiences. T. Barnes Beauty is a lifestyle of beauty brand which offers, spa services, retreats, workshops, boutique events, a high quality organic skincare and full mineral cosmetics line.”

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House of Eli 

Trimicka ‘Mecca’ Crump is a self-represented contemporary abstract artist that lives in the bustling city of Philadelphia. Mecca’s art is a reflection of liberation, trial and inspiration. She is a very new experimental artist who creates in many visual art mediums. She is a writer, teacher, published poet, and spoken word artist. Mecca addresses social subjects such as women’s, racial, and LGBT rights and awareness, social class, and politics through her art.”

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NY State of Mind 

NY STATE OF MIND is an independent lifestyle brand representing NY street culture. Started in the streets of downtown NYC and Brooklyn in 2008. All design, silk screening, painting, sewing, etc. is proudly done under one roof in Brooklyn, NY.”

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House of Marley x AfroPunk Fest

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House of Marley x AfroPunkFest 

AFROPUNK FEST IS BACK FOR ITS 10TH YEAR!! August 23rd – 24th, Commodore Barry Park in Brooklyn, NY will be filled with art, culture and music. “The most multicultural festival in the US” as described by the New York Times. Big names such as Lianne La Havas, Body Count, Trash Talk, and Meshell Ndegeocello and more will be blessing this year’s stages. The festival will be filled with delicious food trucks and a market to satisfy your shopping needs, so come ready to have a good time.

House of Marley is thrilled to partner with AfroPunk 2014. We have a lot of exciting things planned for the festival itself and lots of content about the artists, history, and fashion of Afropunk via our social media over the next week, so STAY TUNED! Even if you can’t make it to Brooklyn, you’ll be able to participate with the festival in spirit with The House of Marley.

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History 

When Matthew Morgan and James Spooner joined forces in 2002, their focus was giving a voice to thousands of multi-cultural kids fiercely identifying with a lifestyle path-less-traveled. Morgan, a visionary with 15 years in the music industry, instinctively understood that the indie rock/punk/hardcore scene had powerful appeal beyond the predictable Caucasian audience; the passion evident in writer-director Spooners hours of riveting hand-shot footage was the indisputable proof. The result: 2003’s ‘Afro-punk’, the seminal cult classic film spotlighting Black Punks in America.

AFROPUNK became a touchstone of a cultural movement strongly reminiscent of the early days of Hip-Hop. Alternative urban kids across the nation (and across the globe) who felt like outsiders discovered they were actually the core of a boldly innovative, fast-growing community. The online members have been the driving force behind the exploding AFROPUNK (AP) culture, creating an authentic virtual home in www.afropunk.com, and nurturing the music’s best and brightest via expansion of the Liberation Sessions, a live performance series hosted by Spooner.

In 2005, the very first annual AFROPUNK Festival debuted to wildly enthusiastic crowds at the iconic Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). Co-curated by Morgan and Spooner, the festival celebrated and unified the cultural cornerstones of AFROPUNK: music, film, skate, and most importantly, the fiercely independent and influential individuals that are the lifeblood of the AP community. AfroPunk.com

Check out some videos of AfroPunk Fest in the past:

House of Marley’s The Get Together: AllDayEveryDay

 

For that brief moment when hasty New Yorkers stop in their tracks and turn into spectators fascinated by a group of break-dancing street performers, the Big Apple tastes a bit sweeter. It is this acrobatic art spawned from the Bronx that unites people around the globe with the joys of laughter, wonder and imagination among many others. For the fourth installment of House of Marley‘s video series highlighting its new Bluetooth speaker The Get Together, Brooklyn-based Director Harrison Boyce chose to look into the personalities of these talented dancers. “I wanted to find out if they really loved dance and the trains were their platform to share their talent with the world, or if they were hustlers using dance to make money, and I quickly found out that they have a deep love for dancing and that the money was secondary.” After checking out Boyce’s film, be sure to read through our full interview with the director below.

For more on House of Marley’s The Get Together Bluetooth speaker as well as how you could win your very own please visit here.

 

Can you introduce yourself?

My name is Harrison Boyce and I’m a director and photographer living in Brooklyn, New York.

How did you get into filmmaking?

It all started through BMX. I rode BMX throughout my whole childhood and ended up being a sponsored rider, then working as an art director for a company, as well as starting one of, if not the first BMX blogs called Defgrip. I was always filming and making videos with my friends, but it wasn’t until I started making short docs and creating content for Defgrip that I really started to get into film making. It was just a hobby for me at the time, but once I moved to New York, I started to get a lot more directing jobs and over the years have transitioned from working as a designer in the BMX world to a director focusing on fashion and commercial work.

What was the goal behind your video? What was your inspiration?

Living in New York I pretty much ride the subway every day and kept seeing these kids dancing in the trains. I had thought about doing a project about them, but it was only in the back of my head and I didn’t really have an outlet for it. So, once I started talking with Alldayeveryday about this project with House of Marley, it made perfect sense to put something together with the dancers for this project.

The goal behind the video for me was to find out who the kids were who were the first to start dancing on the trains and to showcase them as people. To share their personalities with the world and tell their story. I wanted to find out if they really loved dance and the trains were their platform to share their talent with the world, or if they were hustlers using dance to make money… and I quickly found out that they have a deep love for dancing and that the money was secondary.

What are you most excited about your relationship with House of Marley?

House of Marley has been incredible with this project because they just let me do my thing and supported my vision 100%. A lot of time brands can really get involved and almost take over the creative process, but the guys at House of Marley essentially laid down the foundation for a dream project and let me do my thing the whole way though with nothing but support. A perfect partnership.

When you were approached about the project, what was the direction given and then how did you approach your execution/interpretation?

Allday approached me, and I asked if I’d be interested in putting some ideas together around the idea of “getting together.” They really wanted to leave it up to the directors to bring ideas to the table, so it was really open as far as the creative goes.

I just worked on a few different ideas around the idea of “getting together” using music as the main ingredient that actually brought people together.

How influential has music been in your creative evolution?

Music has been a huge influence in my work and it really drives my creative process, especially in the edit. I grew up in a musical family and music has always been something that plays a part in anything I’m doing creatively. Specifically with film, music becomes such a big part of telling a story, creating emotions, and setting a flow and an arch… I like to work with the music first, building a foundation to edit on and everything else really falls into place if you have the right music or soundtrack.

Was there any issues with filming on the subway?

I wasn’t sure how it was going to be bringing a Red camera down there, but we didn’t have any problems at all. I’m pretty good with filming in random situations and can just roll with the flow and the Waffle Crew definitely knows the ins and outs of performing on the subways. We tried to keep moving and not stay in one spot too long and I think that definitely helped us not run into any problems.

You’ve worked on everything from commercial films to short films and fashion films – which of the projects would you say is your favorite to collaborate on?

I think my favorite thing is the fact that I’m able to work on so many different types of projects. To me it’s more about the people and the experiences I have making my work, than the specific type of genre I’m working in. I really like to learn about people, explore new places, and basically do anything I can to learn something new each day. So I feel super lucky that I’ve been able to work on so many diverse projects with such a broad range.

Author: Robert Marshall

*Originally posted on HYPEBEAST