AfroPunk Fest Take Over: Day 2

 

Body Count

Stemming from Los Angeles, this thrash mental band formed in 1990 will definitely turn heads. The front man of the group alongside Ernie C. (lead guitar), is rapper/actor Ice T. Known for their controversial song “Cop Killa”, this group definitely going to put on a great show. Their newest album “Manslaughter” released this past June can be found on iTunes.  Given 4 1/2 stars by iTunes reviewers, this album is definitely one to check out. Body Count will be performing on the Red Stage at 7:45pm on Saturday, August 23rd.

 

Cipher

With a mix hardcore, punk, and metal our next artist highlight is Cipher. The crew was formed in 1996 by close friends who wanted to bring something different to the underground scene. Known for lyrics that push a social mission, these group of dudes will have you rocking out and pondering over a political view. Cipher will be performing on the Black Stage at 4:45pm on Saturday, August 23rd.

 

The Bots 

Recording their first album at 15 and 12, brothers Mikaiah Lei (Lead Vocal, Guitar, Bass), and Anaiah Lei (Drums and Percussions, Backing Vocal) will be playing on our stage (Black Stage) and we are very excited! Their sound is a mix of garage/punk with influences from the American blues and ballad tradition. Their latest release is the single “All I Really Want” which can be found on SoundCloud. The Bots will be performing at 5:45pm on Saturday, August 23rd. 

 

Bad Brains | Dr. Know

“No one would argue that the Bad Brains is one of the most important American punk bands of all time. Considered by many to be the “holy grail” of punk rock, they have a pure and quintessential attitude that most artists only aspire to achieve. Brilliantly melting together both reggae and pure punk rage to create a manic energy never seen before, their influence is deep and wide ranging: Minor Threat, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Beastie Boys, Lil Jon, Living Colour, Matisyahu, Mos Def, 311, hundreds of hardcore bands and any young punk musician” – Afropunk.com. The House of Marley is very excited to see this group perform, they have a sound that we love. Bad Brains | Dr. Know will be performing on the Black Stage at 7pm on Saturday, August 23rd. 


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What is AfroPunk?

“AFROPUNK – “The Rock and Roll N***** Experience” was the original title for the movie before it was changed to what we know as today: AFROPUNK – The Documentary, a 66 minute documentary explores race identify within the punk scene. More than your everyday “Behind the Music” or typical “Black History month “documentary this film tackles hard questions, covering issues such as exile, loneliness, interracial dating and black power. We follow the lives of four people who have dedicated themselves to the punk rock lifestyles. They find themselves in conflicting situations, living the dual life of a person of color in a mostly white community.

AFROPUNK – The Documentary features performances by Bad Brains, Tamar Kali, Cipher, and Ten Grand. It also contains exclusive interviews by members of Fishbone, 247- spyz, Dead Kennedys, Candiria, Orange 9mm and TV on the Radio to name a few” – afropunk.com.

For more news on AFROPUNK go to:
Visit our website: https://www.afropunk.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/afropunk
Twitter: https://twitter.com/afropunk

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AfroPunk Fest Take Over: Day 1

This week leading up until AfroPunk Fest the House of Marley will be highlighting some of the key artists that will be performing, both on our Black Stage and throughout the festival. Today’s spotlight includes Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, HO99O9, Baby Baby, and Sunny Gang. 

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Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings

Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings are a New York based funk/soul band known for their exquisite outfits and notable work with Mark Ronson and Amy Winehouse.  With more than 10 years of recording, touring and shutting down all venues in sight, Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings know the formula to be successful in the music industry. Knowing what their fans want from them and wanting the same thing. This group captured the hearts of their audience and big named acts such as Beck, John Legend and Michael Bublé. “Give the People What They Want” (2013) is their newest released and we can’t wait for what they have next. They will be performing on the Green stage at 8:30pm on Saturday, August 23rd. 

 

Baby Baby

These Atlanta based energetic punk rockers are a group of dudes that you need to check out immediately. They will be rocking out on the Black Stage at 2:45 on Saturday the 23rd. There most recent release is their album “Big Baller Club” which can be purchased on babybabyband.bigcartel.com. Give these dudes a listen and prepare to vibe out.

HO99O9

Pronounced “Horror”, this crew has one of the coolest sounds out of anyone performing at AfroPunk Fest. Their music is an eclectic, aggressive mix of hip hop, thrash core and punk rock or noise as some people like to say.  Since forming in 2012, the group has been known for its provocative lyrical content. But who doesn’t love a little controversy once in a while? HO99O9 will be gracing the Black stage at 1:45pm on Saturday, August 23rd.

 

 Sunny Gang

A four-man punk rock group who loves everything we do: music, partying and having fun.  Their influences stem from hip hop, metal, soul, ska, and funk, and that list sounds great to us! Can’t wait to see these guys show out at AfroPunk Fest. They will be performing on the Black stage at 3:45pm on Saturday, August 23rd.

 

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House of Marley x AfroPunk Fest

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House of Marley x AfroPunkFest 

AFROPUNK FEST IS BACK FOR ITS 10TH YEAR!! August 23rd – 24th, Commodore Barry Park in Brooklyn, NY will be filled with art, culture and music. “The most multicultural festival in the US” as described by the New York Times. Big names such as Lianne La Havas, Body Count, Trash Talk, and Meshell Ndegeocello and more will be blessing this year’s stages. The festival will be filled with delicious food trucks and a market to satisfy your shopping needs, so come ready to have a good time.

House of Marley is thrilled to partner with AfroPunk 2014. We have a lot of exciting things planned for the festival itself and lots of content about the artists, history, and fashion of Afropunk via our social media over the next week, so STAY TUNED! Even if you can’t make it to Brooklyn, you’ll be able to participate with the festival in spirit with The House of Marley.

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History 

When Matthew Morgan and James Spooner joined forces in 2002, their focus was giving a voice to thousands of multi-cultural kids fiercely identifying with a lifestyle path-less-traveled. Morgan, a visionary with 15 years in the music industry, instinctively understood that the indie rock/punk/hardcore scene had powerful appeal beyond the predictable Caucasian audience; the passion evident in writer-director Spooners hours of riveting hand-shot footage was the indisputable proof. The result: 2003’s ‘Afro-punk’, the seminal cult classic film spotlighting Black Punks in America.

AFROPUNK became a touchstone of a cultural movement strongly reminiscent of the early days of Hip-Hop. Alternative urban kids across the nation (and across the globe) who felt like outsiders discovered they were actually the core of a boldly innovative, fast-growing community. The online members have been the driving force behind the exploding AFROPUNK (AP) culture, creating an authentic virtual home in www.afropunk.com, and nurturing the music’s best and brightest via expansion of the Liberation Sessions, a live performance series hosted by Spooner.

In 2005, the very first annual AFROPUNK Festival debuted to wildly enthusiastic crowds at the iconic Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). Co-curated by Morgan and Spooner, the festival celebrated and unified the cultural cornerstones of AFROPUNK: music, film, skate, and most importantly, the fiercely independent and influential individuals that are the lifeblood of the AP community. AfroPunk.com

Check out some videos of AfroPunk Fest in the past:

House of Marley Spotlight – FKA Twigs

 

REX_FKAFKA Twigs, formally known as Twigs released her debut album today titled “LP1″. Stemming from Gloucestershire, southwest England, this mysterious artist of Jamaican decent glides into the House of Marley spotlight. Mysterious, because if you do a google search, good luck finding a live, in person interview. FKA Twigs early years were surrounded by nothing but farmlands, but she managed to study ballet and record music at a studio for Jamaican youths. At 17 she moved to London to pursue a career in dance, even appearing in some Jessie J videos as a backup dancer, but she soon released that this wasn’t the path she wanted to go down. A professional musician was where her heart wanted to be. Like most artists, she spent most of her days in the studio recording as much music as she could. Bar tending was her side gig that help push these dreams. In 2012 she released a self titled EP via bandcamp, Next was EP2, and today we have LP1. Her soft, dreamy voice and poetic words take you to a place that can only discovered in a dream. FKA Twigs is one of the most creative artists in the business right now, and LP1 is one of the most acclaimed debut albums of the 21st century. FKA Twigs also directs her own music videos, and those alone will have your fascinated and hooked to see what she has going for her next. 

Check out her debut album “LP1″ on iTunes now!

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Here are a few tunes that brought our attention to FKA Twigs:

Music Monday: My Funkiest Morning Mix

Happy Monday everyone! Today’s Music Monday features a playlist created by VeroMag. This smooth mix includes your favorite old school reggae sounds with a hint of Ska Punk in the mix. Let us make your Monday a relaxing one. Click play and jam on!

 

 

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Happy Independence Day Jamaica!

August 6th, 1962, INDEPENDENCE DAY! A day that will light up the island of Jamaica until the end of time. Free from three centuries of British rule, ecstatic Jamaicans launched fireworks into the sky as Jamaican flags were lowered all over the island. On this day, National Stadium was filled with over 20,000 emotional people celebrating one of the greatest days of Jamaica. Former Prime Minister Sir Alexander Bustamante gave a poignant analysis of what independence meant to the Jamaican people: “Independence means the opportunity for us to frame our own destiny and the need for us to rely on ourselves in so doing. It does not mean a license to do as we would like. It means work and law and order. Let us resolve to build a Jamaica which will last and of which we and generations to come will be proud, remembering that especially at this time the eyes of the world are upon us.” Today marks 52 years of Independence for the island that has one of the biggest cultural and religious impacts in the world. 
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(Children gather round Norman W Manley during Jamaica’s Independence Day celebrations {Getty}) 

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Princess Margaret arrives at Gordon House to open the first Parliament of Jamaica.

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“The Daily Gleaner” August 8th, 1962

If you’ve never heard the Jamaican National Anthem or the Jamaican Pledge, take a moment and listen to these beautiful words sung and recited.

Music Monday: Best of Popcaan

 

 

Popcaan, Jamaican Reggae artist, born Andre Jay Sutherland on July 15th, 1988 is our Music Monday choice for the week. Popcaan started his dancehall music career when he joined Vybz Kartel crew in 2007, and has been a household name ever since. His debut album “Where We Come From” released on June 10, 2014 has been a huge success. The album climbed to Billboards “Top Reggae Albums” and is sitting nicely at number two. So, if you are a fan of dancehall reggae check out this mix created by DJ Arems. DANCE ON!

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Twitter: @PopcaanMusic 

Facebook: Popcaan

 

Major Lazer’s Walshy Fire Presents: Jesse Royal “Royally Speaking”

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Since its release on July 14th, Jesse Royal’s “Royally Speaking” has been been receiving record-breaking streams on SoundCloud and beyond. Jesse’s smooth voice alongside whine worthy beats takes listeners back to the homeland. These riddims are perfect for your backyard boogie, day time beach party and, of course, your sweaty, underground club.

 

Tracklist:

1. Intro/Warning
2. Hotta the Battle
3. Greedy Babylon
4. Modern Day Judas
5. Preying on the Weak (Overstand Ent.)
6. Clear My Head (Gachapan Records)
7. Light Like A Feather
8. Silent River
9. Good Morning
10. D.O.A (Dreaming of Africa)
11. Baby Let Me Be
12. Butterflies
13. Little Did They Know (XTM Nation)
14. Talk To Me
15. World Cry (Jus Bus Remix)
16. Wadada (Burning Spear Remix)
17. Jam Rock (Gachapan/Palace Pikney Records)
18. Forever (Eccentrix)
19. Gimmie Likkle Herb
20. Muddy Road
21. Runnin
22. Get Away
23. If I Give You My Love (Maya Angelou Speaks)
24. Journey (Gachapan/Palace Pikney Records)
25. Rastafari Call You/Outro

 

www.jesseroyal1.com
www.facebook.com/royallyspeaking
www.twitter.com/jesseroyal1

House of Marley’s The Get Together: Kingston Sound System

Growing up in England during the 1990s, filmmaker Wonford St. James spent many nights dancing in the field to the rhythms of a backyard-styled “free party.” A music lover, James studied these English parties back to its roots and instantly fell in love with the Jamaican sound system culture that eventually migrated to the UK in the ’60s. “Anyone who has ever danced in front of large banks of speakers to music being played by a DJ can thank Jamaican sound systems for that experience.” The impact this genre of music had on the world was felt far and wide, from having a hand in the birth of American hip-hop to inspiring audio purveyors to deliver louder, more portable speakers. So when the New York-based creative was asked to produce a video coinciding with the launch of House of Marley’s new Get Together Bluetooth speaker, James immediately decided to visit Kingston. In his short piece, Albert “iLawi” Johnson – regarded as the original selector – becomes our host through this sound system experience, which is a journey to a simpler, more peaceful time. Be sure to also scroll down to read our full interview with the talented Wonford St. James.

For more on House of Marley’s Get Together Bluetooth speaker as well as how you could win your very own, please visit here.

Can you introduce yourself?

My name is Wonford St. James and I am a filmmaker living in New York by way of London and Los Angeles.

How did you get into filmmaking?

Through a love of photography, music, cameras, art and life.

What was the goal behind your video?

We went to Jamaica to promote a dance and film it. I wanted to celebrate original Jamaican soundsystem culture and share a glimpse into the source of DJ culture. Jamaican music has had a massive, disproportionate, and well documented impact on global popular culture but the role of the soundsystem in the rise of reggae is not as well told. Anyone who has ever danced in front of large banks of speakers to music being played by a DJ can thank Jamaican soundystems for that experience. I want to shine a little light on the original dancehall scene and the energy, style and attitude that goes along with it.

What was your inspiration?

Growing up in England in the ’90s I spent a lot of time dancing all night in fields at “free parties,” so I’ve had traces of sound systems in my blood from an early age. As British house music evolved through that decade, I got heavily into the Jungle scene that blew up coming out of the early rave days. Jungle added the core ingredients of Jamaican dancehall into rave culture to create a uniquely British sound and subculture. You had rolling basslines and chopped out breaks bouncing along with MCs toasting over the music. Incredible and inspiring times. Going to Jamaica to make this little film was like a trip to Mecca.

How does House of Marley differ from other brands?

House of Marley has the opportunity to authentically celebrate a man and an island place with one of the world’s greatest musical heritage. Reggae imagery and attitudes have been brandalized far too often through diluted and distorted expressions of the culture. I hope that House of Marley are able to shine a new light on the subject that is creative and constructive.

What are you most excited about with your relationship with House of Marley?

It’s an exciting young brand with a great team behind it. I would love to take this project to the next level and work with the House of Marley team on a longer format film that explores the evolution and journey of sound system culture, from its roots in Jamaica across the world by way of hip-hop, house and heavy bass.

When you were approached about the project, what was the direction given and then how did you approach your execution/interpretation?

We were asked to create a film that spoke to the idea of an idea being shared; how ‘one’ becomes ‘many.’ This brief alongside a portable speaker made of wood with the Marley name on it immediately pointed me in the direction of Jamaica.

How influential has music been in your creative evolution?

Music has been the central part of my life and creative journey. The reason I live in New York is hip-hop.

What was it like traveling abroad? What were some of your favorite moments and what was some adversity you faced?

We were blessed to work with original selector and music man Albert ‘iLawi’ Johnson on this project who graciously welcomed us into his home to keep the dance at his yard. With iLawi as our guide we cut a blessed path through Kingston, uptown and down. My favorite moment was when the needle hit the first record at the dance. The soundsystem crackled and boomed into life and the place started bouncing. Alongside iLawi, we were blessed with a local producer Michelle Serieux who ensured that the only adversity we faced was whether we were going to run out of Red Stripe before the Guinness arrived.

What type of camera did you use for the film?

We shot the film on an old Canon camera using 8mm color film. These cameras are small, compact, and create a texture and warmth that fits perfectly with the story we were there to capture. The records crackle as the film rolls.

How receptive were the locals to being captured on film?

Jamaicans are lively, proud and beautiful people who are happy to get up in your face, so we had no shortage of potential superstars to liven up the dance.

Author: Robert Marshall

*Originally posted on HYPEBEAST