Music Monday: My Funkiest Morning Mix

Happy Monday everyone! Today’s Music Monday features a playlist created by VeroMag. This smooth mix includes your favorite old school reggae sounds with a hint of Ska Punk in the mix. Let us make your Monday a relaxing one. Click play and jam on!

 

 

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Happy Independence Day Jamaica!

August 6th, 1962, INDEPENDENCE DAY! A day that will light up the island of Jamaica until the end of time. Free from three centuries of British rule, ecstatic Jamaicans launched fireworks into the sky as Jamaican flags were lowered all over the island. On this day, National Stadium was filled with over 20,000 emotional people celebrating one of the greatest days of Jamaica. Former Prime Minister Sir Alexander Bustamante gave a poignant analysis of what independence meant to the Jamaican people: “Independence means the opportunity for us to frame our own destiny and the need for us to rely on ourselves in so doing. It does not mean a license to do as we would like. It means work and law and order. Let us resolve to build a Jamaica which will last and of which we and generations to come will be proud, remembering that especially at this time the eyes of the world are upon us.” Today marks 52 years of Independence for the island that has one of the biggest cultural and religious impacts in the world. 
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(Children gather round Norman W Manley during Jamaica’s Independence Day celebrations {Getty}) 

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Princess Margaret arrives at Gordon House to open the first Parliament of Jamaica.

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“The Daily Gleaner” August 8th, 1962

If you’ve never heard the Jamaican National Anthem or the Jamaican Pledge, take a moment and listen to these beautiful words sung and recited.

10 Facts about Jamaica

Happy Independence Day to all the Jamaicans out there. Here are 10 facts you might or might not know.

Map of Jamaica

1.  Jamaica is the first in the Western world to build a railway only 18 years after Britain and before the United States.

2. The Milk River Bath and Mineral Spa is the most radioactive spa in the world. Its waters are nine and three times more radioactive than those at Bath, England, and those at Karlvoy Vary, Czech Republic respectively.

3. Jamaica is the first English-speaking country in the Caribbean to gain Independence, which was in 1962.

4. Besides the United States, Jamaica is the country which has won the most Olympic and world medals.

5. Jamaica is third place on the list of countries to have ever won the Miss World titles the most.

6. The Golf Club, in the parish of Manchester, is the oldest hotel in the western world and was established in 1868 in Jamaica.

7. Jamaica is the first team from the English-speaking Caribbean to qualify for the Football (Soccer) World Cup. This was the 1998 championship.

8. Jamaica is the first country to sign a Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria grant agreement.

9. Jamaica was the first tropical country to enter the IOC Winter Olympics. The bobsleigh team’s efforts inspired the film Cool Runnings.

10. Jamaica is the first country in the Caribbean region to launch a website, jamaicatravel.com. This was in 1994!

— Melaine Warren

*Originally posted on Jamaica Observer

20 Popular Jamaican Dishes

Check out this awesome list of Jamaican food you should be enjoying for Jamaican
Independence Day!

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1. Jerk Chicken is the most popular Jamaican dish known worldwide for its authentic Jamaican jerk flavor. Using spices such as the pimento, scotch bonnet pepper, scallion, onions and thyme. There are some with their secret ingredients but those are the basic. Served jerk pan style or authentic original style roasted over coals on top of the pimento wood.

2. Jerk pork is second and uses similar seasonings as the jerk chicken. Not as popular as the chicken because it’s more expensive, the most known place in Jamaica to find jerk pork is in Boston, Portland. Because of the popularity of the jerk pork found in Boston, people from all over the island will name their dish “Boston Jerk Pork” which would increase sales, as it is believed that the best tasting pork originated in that part of the island.

3. Red peas (kidney beans) soup made with salt beef and or pig tails. Pig tail in Jamaica is cured with salt and has to be soaked overnight or pre-boil for a few minutes to get some salt out before cooking. The dish is made with the peas, taro, yellow yam, dumplings and scallion, pimento, thyme and pepper. You have a choice to use coconut milk or not, depending on your taste.

4. Steamed fish (at this point there is no particular order because all the dishes are loved the same). In Jamaica is actually stewed fish. It is mostly done on the beach especially Healthshire and some other very popular beaches around the island. Scallion, pimento, pepper, thyme, bammy and sometimes carrots and potatoes are done with this dish. Every cook has their own steam fish style so everywhere you go you get a different flavor….mm mm.

5. Fried fish and fried bammies. In case you are wondering, bammies are made from cassava. Cassava has been in Jamaica for a very long time and was the main staple of the Arawak Indians. The root is grated or milled, squeezed dry and them made into flat (1/2 to ¾ in thick cakes). Bammy is a tasty food and is very popular with fried, steamed or roasted fish.

6. Roast fish. This is really a fish steamed in foil. The fish is seasoned and stuffed with callaloo (the Jamaican spinach) and steamed on a grill. You can season with the jerk spice and it becomes jerk fish.

7. Stewed peas Most households make this dish once per week every week. It’s made with red kidney beans called red peas here in Jamaica. We cook the peas with the pig tail and salt beef until all is soft then we add our seasonings and cook until a gravy is formed. This is quite similar to the soup but the soup has lots more water and this is served with rice. The soup is a dish by itself. In the stewed peas we put some tiny little dumplings called spinners. The taste of the stewed peas and soup are distinctly different.

8. Chicken foot soup. The feet of the chicken are used to make soup. We use pumpkin, carrots, potatoes, cho-cho, yellow yam and a packet of soup powder mix that comes in different flavors.

9. Manish water. This is a soup made from the head, feet and tripe of the ram goat. In some countries it’s known as Billie goat. It is very important to use the ram goat because it gives a different flavor that the “she goat”, yes that’s what we call a nanny goat. Another important ingredient in the mannish water is young bananas. You slice the bananas thinly with skin and all and cook them in the soup. Ingredients include yellow yam, dumpling, potato, pumpkin and carrots. You can add other things if you like. Use a ram goat noodle to flavor the soup!

10. Cow cod soup is another manly soup that only the strongest of men eat. In Jamaica we don’t say “eat soup”, we say “drink soup” because soup must have a lot of fluid that we drink from the soup bowl. In case you are wondering what is the cow cod, it is the testicles and or the manly organ of the bull. We call both male and female cows, even the bull…lol but it’s really bull cod soup. Add your ingredients to your preference.

11.Curried goat This is maybe the third or fourth most popular dish but it is not 100% Jamaican. The idea of the curry is Indian but the method of making the dish is Jamaican. The Indian will burn their spices in the oil before adding the meat. Jamaicans add their spices directly to the meat, rubbing in the flavor with their hands. We make sure the oil is smoking than add the meat and cover the pot. We stir the meat ever so often to keep it from burning. When we are satisfied that the seasoning has penetrated the meat enough and it has a good color we add a little water. If the there is fluid in the pot from steaming the meat, we let it cook in its own juices until ready to eat. Serve with white rice and boiled green bananas.

12. Curried chicken is a very popular quick meal that friends make when they are on the river at a cookout or after a football match. It is done similarly to the curried goat but cooked much quicker. The chicken is cut into small to medium or even bite sized pieces.

13. Fricassee chicken is a commonly known as stewed chicken. It is usually seasoned with all your favorite spices and placed and pot with hot oil and covered to let steam and cook in it’s own juices. Browning or soy sauce is used to make it dark. Did I mention that Jamaicans like their meat dark?

14. Brown stewed chicken This is done by frying the chicken until dark brown then stewing with seasoning and water until the gravy has a nice consistency. This is the most popular Sunday dinner served with rice and peas.

15. Tripe and beans The cow tripe is cleaned and washed in the river. I like it if I make it myself because the truth is I am a bit persnickety when it come to my food. Broad beans are cooked with the tripe and stomach to make a nice stew, eaten with rice.

16. Oxtail and beans I love the tail of the ox which is larger than the regular cow tail. This part of the animal is closer to the spine so when jointed you get a nice looking piece of meat. It takes a long time to cook so start cooking 3 hours before dinner. It is often cooked with broad beans.

17. Salt Fish (cod fish) run dung (run down) This dish is definitely maybe one of the most original and authentic Jamaican dishes you will find anywhere. The coconut milk is reduced to about a third then the cod fish which has been soaked or boiled is cut into bite size pieces and added to the coconut reduction. Season with scallion, thyme, scotch bonnet pepper and lots of black pepper. Served with dumplings, renta yam and boiled bananas or roast breadfruit.

18. Ackee and saltfish This is our national dish and should be at the number one spot but unfortunately a lot of people around the world don’t know the ackee and certainly not the dish. Ackee is a fruit that is consumed like a vegetable. It is usually cooked until tender (about 15 -20 minutes), the cod fish is boiled with the ackee to give the ackee flavor and to reduce the saltiness. The cod fish is cut into very small pieces after being boiled. The water that they were boiled in is thrown away and the cod fish is cooked with scallion, onions, garlic and pepper then the ackee and black pepper are added. Stir thoroughly and serve with roast breadfruit or yam, boiled bananas and dumplings. Also very nice with warm bread or white rice.

19. Fish tea This is actually fish soup. There are different versions, some lighter than others drinking like a broth while others are a full meal. The most common fish to use for this is the doctor fish which is said to put back strength in the body. Add your preferred vegetables but remember to add the young green bananas.

20. Cow Foot This one I am not very fond of but many people love it. It takes a while to cook and is served with almost any staple you want. Remember to season this well to make sure it’s flavorful. You may add beans if you like.

Author: Cardissa

*Originally posted on Hub Pages 

Music Monday: Best of Popcaan

 

 

Popcaan, Jamaican Reggae artist, born Andre Jay Sutherland on July 15th, 1988 is our Music Monday choice for the week. Popcaan started his dancehall music career when he joined Vybz Kartel crew in 2007, and has been a household name ever since. His debut album “Where We Come From” released on June 10, 2014 has been a huge success. The album climbed to Billboards “Top Reggae Albums” and is sitting nicely at number two. So, if you are a fan of dancehall reggae check out this mix created by DJ Arems. DANCE ON!

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Twitter: @PopcaanMusic 

Facebook: Popcaan

 

Major Lazer’s Walshy Fire Presents: Jesse Royal “Royally Speaking”

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Since its release on July 14th, Jesse Royal’s “Royally Speaking” has been been receiving record-breaking streams on SoundCloud and beyond. Jesse’s smooth voice alongside whine worthy beats takes listeners back to the homeland. These riddims are perfect for your backyard boogie, day time beach party and, of course, your sweaty, underground club.

 

Tracklist:

1. Intro/Warning
2. Hotta the Battle
3. Greedy Babylon
4. Modern Day Judas
5. Preying on the Weak (Overstand Ent.)
6. Clear My Head (Gachapan Records)
7. Light Like A Feather
8. Silent River
9. Good Morning
10. D.O.A (Dreaming of Africa)
11. Baby Let Me Be
12. Butterflies
13. Little Did They Know (XTM Nation)
14. Talk To Me
15. World Cry (Jus Bus Remix)
16. Wadada (Burning Spear Remix)
17. Jam Rock (Gachapan/Palace Pikney Records)
18. Forever (Eccentrix)
19. Gimmie Likkle Herb
20. Muddy Road
21. Runnin
22. Get Away
23. If I Give You My Love (Maya Angelou Speaks)
24. Journey (Gachapan/Palace Pikney Records)
25. Rastafari Call You/Outro

 

www.jesseroyal1.com
www.facebook.com/royallyspeaking
www.twitter.com/jesseroyal1

House of Marley’s The Get Together: Kingston Sound System

Growing up in England during the 1990s, filmmaker Wonford St. James spent many nights dancing in the field to the rhythms of a backyard-styled “free party.” A music lover, James studied these English parties back to its roots and instantly fell in love with the Jamaican sound system culture that eventually migrated to the UK in the ’60s. “Anyone who has ever danced in front of large banks of speakers to music being played by a DJ can thank Jamaican sound systems for that experience.” The impact this genre of music had on the world was felt far and wide, from having a hand in the birth of American hip-hop to inspiring audio purveyors to deliver louder, more portable speakers. So when the New York-based creative was asked to produce a video coinciding with the launch of House of Marley’s new Get Together Bluetooth speaker, James immediately decided to visit Kingston. In his short piece, Albert “iLawi” Johnson – regarded as the original selector – becomes our host through this sound system experience, which is a journey to a simpler, more peaceful time. Be sure to also scroll down to read our full interview with the talented Wonford St. James.

For more on House of Marley’s Get Together Bluetooth speaker as well as how you could win your very own, please visit here.

Can you introduce yourself?

My name is Wonford St. James and I am a filmmaker living in New York by way of London and Los Angeles.

How did you get into filmmaking?

Through a love of photography, music, cameras, art and life.

What was the goal behind your video?

We went to Jamaica to promote a dance and film it. I wanted to celebrate original Jamaican soundsystem culture and share a glimpse into the source of DJ culture. Jamaican music has had a massive, disproportionate, and well documented impact on global popular culture but the role of the soundsystem in the rise of reggae is not as well told. Anyone who has ever danced in front of large banks of speakers to music being played by a DJ can thank Jamaican soundystems for that experience. I want to shine a little light on the original dancehall scene and the energy, style and attitude that goes along with it.

What was your inspiration?

Growing up in England in the ’90s I spent a lot of time dancing all night in fields at “free parties,” so I’ve had traces of sound systems in my blood from an early age. As British house music evolved through that decade, I got heavily into the Jungle scene that blew up coming out of the early rave days. Jungle added the core ingredients of Jamaican dancehall into rave culture to create a uniquely British sound and subculture. You had rolling basslines and chopped out breaks bouncing along with MCs toasting over the music. Incredible and inspiring times. Going to Jamaica to make this little film was like a trip to Mecca.

How does House of Marley differ from other brands?

House of Marley has the opportunity to authentically celebrate a man and an island place with one of the world’s greatest musical heritage. Reggae imagery and attitudes have been brandalized far too often through diluted and distorted expressions of the culture. I hope that House of Marley are able to shine a new light on the subject that is creative and constructive.

What are you most excited about with your relationship with House of Marley?

It’s an exciting young brand with a great team behind it. I would love to take this project to the next level and work with the House of Marley team on a longer format film that explores the evolution and journey of sound system culture, from its roots in Jamaica across the world by way of hip-hop, house and heavy bass.

When you were approached about the project, what was the direction given and then how did you approach your execution/interpretation?

We were asked to create a film that spoke to the idea of an idea being shared; how ‘one’ becomes ‘many.’ This brief alongside a portable speaker made of wood with the Marley name on it immediately pointed me in the direction of Jamaica.

How influential has music been in your creative evolution?

Music has been the central part of my life and creative journey. The reason I live in New York is hip-hop.

What was it like traveling abroad? What were some of your favorite moments and what was some adversity you faced?

We were blessed to work with original selector and music man Albert ‘iLawi’ Johnson on this project who graciously welcomed us into his home to keep the dance at his yard. With iLawi as our guide we cut a blessed path through Kingston, uptown and down. My favorite moment was when the needle hit the first record at the dance. The soundsystem crackled and boomed into life and the place started bouncing. Alongside iLawi, we were blessed with a local producer Michelle Serieux who ensured that the only adversity we faced was whether we were going to run out of Red Stripe before the Guinness arrived.

What type of camera did you use for the film?

We shot the film on an old Canon camera using 8mm color film. These cameras are small, compact, and create a texture and warmth that fits perfectly with the story we were there to capture. The records crackle as the film rolls.

How receptive were the locals to being captured on film?

Jamaicans are lively, proud and beautiful people who are happy to get up in your face, so we had no shortage of potential superstars to liven up the dance.

Author: Robert Marshall

*Originally posted on HYPEBEAST

A Look into The Football Concierge

With the end of the World Cup, soccer jerseys are hot on the market. So why not customize your own? By appointment only at the Football Concierge, Nowhere FC can create the kit of your dreams. Located at 100 Forsyth Street, you can play a game of pick up across the street, while your jersey is hot on the press. The House of Marley had the opportunity to go behind the scenes and document the process of customizing a jersey. It was a sight to see, check the photos below. We even got in touch with founder Diego Moscoso (designer for Marc Jacobs and Supreme) and picked his brain about his company.

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1. When did you guys first link up with House of Marley?

We met them through TheGoodlife! who have a creative agency and team in our league; we’ve known them for years through their parties and recently got introduced to House of Marley and some of the sound systems they make we use for our space. Love it so far.

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2. When did Nowhere FC form?

We’ve had a team called Nowhere FC for years in the Bowery leagues and Adidas Fanatic league. We make our own kits and work with a large label company called Avery Dennison who makes a lot of the actual badges for Nike and Adidas, used on the top pro and national team kits. They test and make samples of most of their new sports labels and branding with Nowhere FC and use this to create new ideas for the big brands and clubs for future use. We’ve been doing this for a while and so for World Cup we wanted to put all the things we’ve been making into one space for our fans and friends to touch and get to sample on their own jerseys. So we thought to make a “travel agency” that brings Brasil to NY for the month. it’s called the Football Concierge, taking private appointments at 100 Forsyth next to the Chinatown field that is home to our league and team.

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3. What is the design process before you start to make a jersey?

We appreciate the history of jerseys, and in soccer, there is a long history. For over 150 years clubs from all over the world, beginning in England, have been making variations of their home, away, and alternative kits to wear as a flag for their identity abroad. We follow in this tradition and design our own stuff that tells our story in NY, but also how we see global soccer, a reflection. Our color is Maroon, to symbolize being from Nowhere and the “Maroons” of Latin American colonialism, escaped slaves and runaway indigenous people who made their new nomad colonies for survival, often in the mountain tops. The Spanish word cimarrón was used, meaning like “in the mountaintops”, in reference to the people, ultimately translating and becoming the root word Maroon in english: to be isolated in a remote area, etc. Our process is about telling stories, and for this world cup event we allowed friends and guests to use our menu of graphics to make their own jersey that tells their custom story.

 

 

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4. What is your favorite jersey you have customized?

Each is fun, one on one with people you never know what you will get. I like to be surprised by people and letting them design or customize is where that happens. Better than being in an office any day.

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5. What is the most complicated jersey you have customized?

There have been many over-the-top ideas. the more complicated the better, especially if it’s really ugly. It still looks better than NASCAR.

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6. What makes The Football Concierge unique and stand out against its competitors?

We don’t have competitors. We are just making stuff, don’t know anyone else who makes things in this way. I’d say we are competing with Nike, Adidas, Puma, and Major League Soccer, etc. Competing for the minds of future football fans to follow authenticity and inspire them to create their own identity and not let FIFA or the brands dictate to them what football or style looks like.

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7. Do you plan on expanding the business in the near future?

It’s inevitable I guess. Football is a religion, it’s not my hand that makes these jerseys, it’s the hand of God.

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8. Any dope collaborations from the past?

We made some great kits with Richardson magazine, I think they sell them on their site and store in NY, maybe in Japan. They have a great independent brand model and have been around for awhile in our neighborhood, so it only seemed natural. The visionary behind it, Andrew is a Liverpool man and knows what proper shirts should look like, so I’m happy with the black and white strong look he choose. It compliments our usual fruity-pebbles too much color vibe.

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We’re also making some customizations to some of the Bob Marley track suits re-released by Wear Marley. They basically brought back the iconic styles that Bob wore while playing, so it was fun to see those live again, and then to be able to add our international badges and theme as we think Bob was all about ‘one world,’ and giving these to our friends in NY to wear and personalize was the icing on the cake.

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9. Which staff member is the best soccer player?

Our team is all pretty decent ! Ex-college D-1, or semi-pro, mixed styles. The league we play in is real hard-body-karate these days, getting better all the time and not far from pro, with the influx of people coming to NY from everywhere. So our guys play soccer first and everything else like work and food and silliness comes second. Many of them play in other pro systems or are involved with the pro game on some level. But the Coach is the best overall international playboy, Simonez Wolf, and he’s also a chef so go figure. That’s another story in and of itself.

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Alexander Richter – The Man Behind the Lens

NYC based photographer Alexander Richter has one of the best eyes for capturing your favorite artists in their most natural setting. Photography is one of the most intriguing and populated art forms, but Alexander manages to stay on top. No glitz, glamour or over-photoshopped photos. Alexander uses the right adjustments to make you feel like you were there when the photo was captured. House of Marley was blessed with the chance to pick up some knowledge and gain a better understanding of Alexander’s work. Check out AlexanderRichterphoto.com for an inside scoop.

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How did you link with the House of Marley, and what attracted you to the brand?

I grew up as a fan of reggae and was heavily influenced by Bob’s music. Fast forward to 2012 when I traveled to Kingston for 7 days with a friend of mine to create the photo-based documentary project called SEVENS CLASH. Upon my return I re-connected with Tracy from The House Of Marley and we mutually took an interest in what the other was doing. We had meetings which led to me learning about their amazing audio products, and now here we are.

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How do you deal with an artist or a person that is super camera shy or has the “I don’t want to be here” attitude during a shoot?

I think being personable is one of the best attributes to have as a photographer. In order to make good photos you have to be able to connect with your subject. I tend to work very close to the people I’m photographing, sometimes within inches of their face, so creating a good exchange of energy is critical. It seems obvious, but I’ve had plenty of shoots where the people I am photographing tell me horror stories about working with other photographers who just stay behind the camera and fail to communicate with their subject. Which to me is crazy because it’s that exchange of energy that creates the best photos. So I would have to say it’s critical that if you are having a shoot with someone who is not keen on taking pic
tures that you take some time and just talk with them. Don’t even break out the camera until the vibe is right.   

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What are the top things you consider when location scouting?

Locations are driven by the person that I’m photographing so when I get commissioned to do a shoot I begin to think about the person I am shooting and visualize environments that would complement whomever they are. I like to look for colors, different surfaces (glass, metal, wood), textures, light & shadow. Obviously there are jobs with creative directions which drive a shoot but it’s always good to have an eye out for something different so that you can place someone there and create a shot that wasn’t in the brief.

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With the infiltration of people with digital cameras and Photoshop, how does your photography set itself apart from the masses?

I try not to think about what other people are doing, but if I had to answer it I would say my eyes. No one else sees the world the same way I do and as a result I create photographs that reflect that. I also get my camera into places that other people might be interested in seeing, but aren’t willing to take the risk to make it happen. I have had the opportunity to have access to worlds that not everyone is welcomed to and with those moments I have worked hard to show that experience, whether it was in Jamaica, working with graffiti writers in NYC, or exploring new generations of hip hop artists in Chicago. In addition to that, I take great care in composition, in lighting, and execution of the image at that decisive moment.

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Why do you think companies choose you to do shoots for them over the next photographer?

I think people tend to be attracted to the raw feeling of my work. I don’t do loads of Photoshop to my images. I try to create my images in camera the way that I am seeing them on the print side. And whether you like them or not, they will make you feel some type of way. If they don’t, then I haven’t done my job. I think people also like the fact that I work with different mediums as well. I shoot with a digital 35mm, Polaroid land & passport cameras, 35mm film, and medium & large format film cameras as well. Each camera has its own voice so using a variety of tools helps me create unique images.

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What type of research do you do on an artist or person before you start a photo shoot?

I try to do as much research as possible. I like to know something about each subject I’m working with so that I can start on some sort of equal playing field if possible. I think having different points of communication is key to connecting with your subject so it’s always beneficial to know about who you are working with. I also look at photos that other photographers have made so that I can challenge myself to create work completely different than anyone else.

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When did your interest transition from film to photography?

Well, I went to school for film and at first that’s what I set out to do. Around 2004/2005, I discovered my father’s Hasselblad, began shooting more, and realized that photography was what I was meant to do.

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What is your favorite type of camera?

I don’t have a favorite camera. Whatever camera I have in my hands at the time is the camera that I need.

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Are you more into digital photography or film (analog) photography?

I love it all. They both have their place and I’m grateful to understand and use both.

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Photo Credit: Alexander Richter

Polaroids – Diahann Williams

House of Marley to Donate $100 for any donation made to the Reggae Girlz

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Yes! You read correctly — for ANY and EVERY donation, for ANY amount given, the House of Marley will match with $100. (Until we reach 25k)!

The House of Marley will be matching each donation that is given towards the Reggae Girlz World Cup 2015 Bid. For every NEW donation over the next few days, we will donate $100 for each $1 that is donated.

Referral Contest: In addition to the House of Marley matching your donation, you can also win a House of Marley Get Together Audio System. Using the Indiegogo share tools, send this campaign to as many friends & family as you can. The donor with the most referrals wins the Sound System!

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This campaign is not only for the Reggae Girlz, it is about empowering girls and women from all walks of life through athletics and beyond. Financial burdens should never be a road block in achieving one’s goals and dreams.

Canada June 6th – July 5th, will be the location of the 2015 Women’s World Cup and the next destination for our Reggae Girlz. The Jamaica’s Women’s National Team has partnered with Cedella Marley to raise money for the Women’s World Cup 2015 bid. Want to get in on the action? You can do so by donating through the Reggae Girlz’ Indiegogo page.

We encourage you to donate and spread the word!

For more information please check out the Reggae Girls Indiegogo Page